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8 Ways to Foster a Positive Workplace Culture

It is easy to identify those companies that have an amazing workplace culture. They’ve created environments that allow their teams to be focused, driven and innovative. Conversely, you won’t struggle to find those organizations that don’t have a positive culture. They often have high staff turnover, toxic leadership, and gossip and rumor run rampant. But how did they get to these places? Fostering workplace culture starts with you and will be a crucial foundation as you build your company.

Workplace culture is your company’s character and personality. It’s what makes you unique and is the sum of its values, traditions, beliefs, interactions, behaviors, and attitudes. Positive cultures will always attract the best talent and impacts happiness, satisfaction, and performance. Of course, your culture will be shaped by leadership, management, policies, people, and your work practices too. Because of that, you need to pay attention to the type of culture that you want to foster from the very start.

Positive workplace culture can take different forms, depending on what your goal is. There are eight main types of cultures that all have a slightly different focus. Let’s break these down and see what they look like.




Types of Workplace Culture


1. Adhocracy Culture

The main priority is growing quickly; therefore, they tend to be high-energy and agile. They encourage their teams to challenge the status quo and push them to develop services and offerings that are better than before.  They will stand out in the marketplace, but its fast-paced environment won’t suit all employees.

2. Clan Culture

It is a supportive environment where the input of employees is as valued as the upper management. Communication is open and informal, and it is seen as a “family.” It encourages open, honest feedback to the management team and creates strong relationships throughout the organization. But it can come across as too relaxed and informal.

3. Customer-Focused Culture

The focus is on giving employees the necessary tools and autonomy to put the customer first at all times. In addition, it creates long-term customer loyalty that will make the company successful. Employees are given the freedom to make decisions and take pride in their work, but they may feel neglected. 

4. Hierarchy Culture 

Usually found in industries such as finance, government, and healthcare. The idea is that everyone has a very clear role and purpose within the organization. As a result, these organizations are risk-averse and stick to rules and traditions.

These are the most efficient types of companies but often feel old-fashioned and constrictive to employees.

5. Market-Driven Culture

Performance and results-focused, they often forgo employee experience and satisfaction. The goal is to get products to market, and so company culture is of secondary importance. This culture is highly susceptible to burnout.

6. Purpose-Driven Culture

Built on a defined vision, they attract customers, partners, and employees who usually share those ideals. They also usually give back to the community through charity. These organizations often have high retention rates. However, the desire to give back over increasing profit margins means they will make less money. 

7. Innovative Culture

Constantly looking to build on existing tech and creating new solutions, they push conventional thinking to the side in favor of new ideas.  Employees have the freedom to try new things and experiment, but the constant push for innovation may leave employees feeling burnt-out.

8. Creative Culture

These focus on end goals and how best to achieve them. They encourage collaboration and teamwork and focus on providing new experiences to consumers. It is less about the individuals and more about the team. It builds strong relationships between teams and individuals, reduces downtime, and creates an environment where employees fear falling short of expectations.

So how do you create a positive workplace culture? Here are eight points you can focus on from the very start.

 

Fostering a Positive Workplace Culture

1. A Strong Code of Ethics

The comfort and safety of your teams should be the number one priority for you. Unfortunately, a recent survey found that only 11% of employees who witnessed unethical behavior at work felt unaffected by it. Establish a zero-tolerance policy when it comes to immoral, illegal, or discriminatory behavior.

2. Inclusive Hiring Processes

Diverse backgrounds allow for different experiences, points of view, and ideologies to thrive. Take into consideration race, religion, sexual orientation, and educational background when defining your hiring process.

3. Optimize Onboarding

Invest in your team from the moment they are hired. By scheduling training, paperwork, and check-ins with new staff, they will immediately feel like valued team members.

4. Clear Communication and Active Listening

Create clear reporting lines and appropriate methods of communication. Also, clarifying employees’ roles and exceptions is vital. Finally, active listening will ensure that clear communication is effective and also fosters respect amongst your teams.

5. Regular Check-Ins

Managers should meet or speak to their teams often. They can monitor engagement and manage workloads but also identify issues as and when they arise.

6. Comfortable Work Environment 

Ensure your teams have everything they need to succeed. Comfortable chairs, monitors, keyboards are important, but also consider things like healthy snacks or food options and natural light.

7. Compensation

Pay your employees what they deserve. Fair wages and incentives will make your teams feel valued and increase productivity; however, don’t underestimate the cost of onboarding when staff turnover is high. 

8. Encourage Time-Off

You may have competitive time-off benefits, but employees may be reluctant to take advantage of them because of workloads or deadlines. Encourage teams to take breaks and time away, they’ll appreciate it, and productivity will remain steady.

Other common qualities to consider are things such as; growth opportunities, emphasizing creativity, and healthy work relationships. But remember that all cultures are unique, and building yours will take time, careful planning, and consideration. But ultimately, it will all be worthwhile. 

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Jayson Ellis
Staff Writer: Jayson Ellis is a South African-based entrepreneur and writer with experience in marketing, operations, business development, and human relations. In my career, I've been exposed to many different projects, roles, and people. This has taught invaluable skills essential in today's workplace.

Currently, he owns a restaurant in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also a regular contributor to websites and blogs on topics ranging from lifestyle to business.

His passion lies in uplifting those around him, sharing skills, and offering any guidance he can to those around him. You can check out more of Jayson's writings at https://www.clippings.me/jaysonellis

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Find Your Way · Grow Your Business · Leading Your Team · Productivity · Your Mindset
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https://www.clippings.me/jaysonellis

Staff Writer: Jayson Ellis is a South African-based entrepreneur and writer with experience in marketing, operations, business development, and human relations. In my career, I've been exposed to many different projects, roles, and people. This has taught invaluable skills essential in today's workplace. Currently, he owns a restaurant in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also a regular contributor to websites and blogs on topics ranging from lifestyle to business. His passion lies in uplifting those around him, sharing skills, and offering any guidance he can to those around him. You can check out more of Jayson's writings at https://www.clippings.me/jaysonellis

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